IS THERE ROOM IN YOUR HEARD FOR A SENIOR?

IS THERE ROOM IN YOUR HEART
FOR A SENIOR?


NOVEMBER IS IS ADOPT A SENIOR MONTH
Here's an article on the subject by Cesar Milan
 
SPECIAL DOGS ... WE ADVOCATE SENIORS FOR SENIORS!
TEEKAH

Teekah was 10 years old when her Mom was no longer able to take care of her; now adopted and living the good life chasing rabbits in Flagstaff
Our gentle giant Gordy left for the Bridge on February 26, 2010. He was at home surrounded by his entire human and canine family and enveloped in love. He would have turned 9 years old this April.

Sandra and John Krisch adopted Gordy two and a half years ago knowing that their time with him would likely be less that they would have liked. Sandra & John are our heroes; they have seven senior canines and are acutely aware of the need for these special fur kids to have a loving place to hang their hat in their golden years.


GORDY RECENTLY IN HIS FAVORITE SPOT--HIS SUV


THE CLAN KEEPS GROWING

Seniors themselves, the Krischs' established a foundation designated solely to help such dogs in need. Gordy was a very special dog and his Mom & Dad are, indeed, very special people for whom we are very thankful.

What Is Gordy Thinking?

ADOPTED!!!

Canyon
9 year old neutered male (BIG OLE BOY) surrendered to the HUMANE SOCIETY OF YUMA due owners moving...on borrowed time Was house dog until now, does well with kids and other dogs We will bail him out and bring him to you..NO FEE
ADOPTED!

Kelly
10 yo SPAYED EASY KEEPER--USED FOR BREEDING MOST OF HER LIFE. Has, thankfully, lost weight since this photo. OWNER OF LAST 4 YEARS HAD TO GIVE HER UP; SHE DESPERATELY NEEDS A LOVING, PERMANENT HOME; EXCELLENT COMPANION FOR RETIREE..NO CATS
ADOPTED!

Hercules
10 year old described as smart and friendly; Dumped at the shelter by owner for no specific reason; shelter staff loved him. This senior is no couch potato! He has many years of life left in him. HERC HAS NOW BEEN ADOPTED BY HIS FOSTER MOM!

ONE BY ONE ...

One by One, they pass by my cage,
Too old, too worn, too broken, no way.
Way past his time, he can't run and play.
Then they shake their heads slowly and go on their way.

A little old man, arthritic and sore,
It seems I am not wanted anymore.
I once had a home, I once had a bed,
A place that was warm, and where I was fed.
Now my muzzle is gray, and my eyes slowly fail.
Who wants a dog so old and so frail?

My family decided I didn't belong,
I got in their way, my attitude was wrong.
Whatever excuse they made in their head,
Can't justify how they left me for dead.
Now I sit in this cage, where day after day,
The younger dogs get adopted away.

When I had almost come to the end of my rope,
You saw my face, and I finally had hope.
You saw thru the gray, and the legs bent with age,
And felt I still had life beyond this cage.
You took me home, gave me food and a bed,
And shared your own pillow with my poor tired head.

We snuggle and play, and you talk to me low,
You love me so dearly, you want me to know.
I may have lived most of my life with another,
But you outshine them with a love so much stronger.
And I promise to return all the love I can give,
To you, my dear person, as long as I live.

I may be with you for a week, or for years,
We will share many smiles, you will no doubt shed tears.
And when the time comes that God deems I must leave,
I know you will cry and your heart, it will grieve.
And when I arrive at the Bridge, all brand new,
My thoughts and my heart will still be with you.
And I will brag to all who will hear,
Of the person who made my last days so dear.

           ~ Author Unknown

"There's nothing like the knowledgeable, tender, loving heart of an old dog. It's grand that some of us can experience such a happening." Kathy Sater-Partch


Heidi
ADOPTED!!
Left by her owner at a boarding kennel, Heidi was wasting away in a 6x10 foot run until a member of our staff found her.

GRETA's STORY

 
 

Ossie
ADOPTED!!
Ossie was surrendered by his owner at the ripe old age of 12 and found a new home through SWGSDR.


Seven and a half year old Leibe gets a new home and a new lease on life.

NINE YEAR OLD ROXIE SPENT HER ENTIRE LIFE TIED TO A TREE BEING BRED FOR PROFIT; SHE COULD BARELY WALK. SWGSR & FOREVER MOM PEGGY CHANGED ALL OF THAT AND PUT A GRATEFUL TWINKLE IN ROXIE'S EYES

10 REASONS TO ADOPT AN OLDER DOG

WHEN OLDER DOGS ARE THE BEST ADOPTION CHOICE

EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT ADOPTING AN OLDER DOG

This is "Cody" [now "Bear"]. He'll be 10 years old in August, 2003. He was sold by a local breeder on a neuter contract -- he wasn't. In fact, he's never seen the inside of a vet's office. He was not "abused," just neglected. He lived outside in his yard and adopted ferral cats to keep himself company. They would drop in to grab his food, which he gladly shared. So one, in particular, figured this was a good deal and decided to hang around. At least long enough to spend nights in his dog house with him, between prowling. No one could get near this cat but Cody. He's just that kinda guy.

I didn't hold out much hope for this little bear. His coat, much like a bird's nest, reflected years of outdoor living and poor diet. He doesn't know the difference between stay or come; he seldom makes eye contact. Let's face it, Senior GSD citizens are not at the top of everyone's wish list. But that's all before Lisa and Steve Neff came into the picture. These remarkable people have 3 other canine rescues along with 3 feline rescues. They managed to open their arms just a bit wider to make room for Cody. They drove from their home in Tucson to Phoenix with Roscoe (their 8 year old GSD rescue) to make sure he and Cody could peacefully co-exist. The Neffs now have 4 canine rescues! The Neff's are truly special people and Cody and I thank them from the bottom of our hearts.

NEW LAMPS FOR OLD, THE TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR DOGS AND "MY MASTER WITH LOVE"


Shawnee
ADOPTED!!
At 8, Shawnee was the victim of a broken home.

Ema
ADOPTED!!
Picked up by Chino Valley Animal Control, as a 13 year old senior, Ema was slated to die -- we couldn't let that happen

Hank
ADOPTED!!
Found wandering the streets with a female GSD, Hank (age 7) found his forever home with our help

Mesha
ADOPTED!!
10 years old and unceremoniously dumped at the AZ Humane Society, Mesha is now the very much loved member of the Banyas family, who simply cannot imagine life without him, nor he them.

GUS was found wandering in a wash in Yuma, then taken to the local shelter where he age was estimated to be 10 years. That, in and of itself, was his death sentence. Cyndi, our Yuma volunteer felt that the loss of such a precious life was unacceptable and contacted us. Somewhat skeptical about our ability to successfully place a mixed breed senior with a mystery history, we nonetheless agreed to take him on.

Gus & Cyndi arrive in Phoenix

Gus offers an "Olive Branch" to foster Mom Betty
Probably closer to nine years old, Gus is now "Gabe" and VERY happily and permanently living with his Mom Joyce, who is equally ecstatic with his companionship; they're about the same age! We regularly hear from his Mom who continues to marvel at what a perfect match Gabe is for her and she him!

GABRIEL GRATEFULLY SHADOWS HIS
FOREVER MOM EVERYWHERE

JOLIE CONFUSED ON SURRENDER DAY, NOW
MUCH LOVED BY GRANDPA TIO & MOM JESSICA

 SPECIAL ANGELS-JULY 2008
Sandra and John Krisch and their adopted fur kid Gordy along with their family of more recently rescued seniors. We could sure use more of these kind & generous folks who can easily see and appreciate the value and wisdom of an older dog.

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Nova, Molly, Nera & Gordy
This family photo also appears in the annual report of the Arizona Community Foundation

RUFUS was relinquished by his family when a new wife entered the picture. He was adopted at 10 years of age by Jerry, a gentleman with extensive working dog and canine competition experience. Despite his past successes, Jerry wisely acknowledged that, as a senior himself, his needs were now more for just a good companion dog.

We hear from Jerry regularly, each time he marvels at how well matched they are for one another, "he's absolutely a perfect dog" says Jerry, "I couldn't have imagined how well we fit".....they are, after all, around the same age.

Our Tucson rep Nicki stops by once a month to trim Rufus' nails and each time is met with "thanks for putting us together."


TWO VERY CONTENT DUDES

TOP TEN REASONS TO ADOPT AN OLDER DOG

1.  Older dogs are housetrained.

2.  Older dogs are not teething puppies, and won't chew your shoes and furniture while growing up.

3.  Older dogs can focus well because they've mellowed. Therefore, they learn quickly.

4.  Older dogs have learned what "no" means. If they hadn't learned it, they wouldn't have gotten to be "older" dogs.

5.  Older dogs settle in easily, because they've learned what it takes to get along with others and become part of a pack.

6.  Older dogs are good at giving love, once they get into their new, loving home. They are grateful for the second chance they've been given.

7.  What You See Is What You Get: Unlike puppies, older dogs have grown into their shape and personality. Puppies can grow up to be quite different from what they seemed at first.

8.  Older dogs are instant companions -- ready for hiking, car trips, and other things you like to do.

9.  Older dogs leave you time for yourself, because they don't make the kinds of demands on your time and attention that puppies and young dogs do.

10.  Older dogs let you get a good night's sleep because they're accustomed to human schedules and don't need nighttime feedings, comforting, or bathroom breaks.

*Adapted from Labrador Retriever Rescue's "Top Ten Reasons to Adopt a Rescue."

WHEN OLDER DOGS ARE THE BEST ADOPTION CHOICE

There are many wonderful dogs needing rescue -- not only the adorable puppies we all love to cuddle. Often overlooked (and euthanized as "unadoptable") are older dogs, most of whom would be perfect for those who do not have the time to housetrain or the energy level necessary for a younger dog. The older rescue is ideal for a household with very young children: the dog's temperament is known and housetraining and obedience lessons don't have to be undertaken at the same time diapers need to be changed. ...Some convalescent and nursing homes make arrangments for pets to come and live with their owners, knowing the therapeutic value and the sense of loss to both patient and pet when they are separated.

Thanks to Lori Campbell for also posting to the Senior-L list a report from a nurse in Tennessee: "I had a patient last week who is in her eighties, suffers from several disorders and has lost most of her vision to macular degeneration. She had always had dogs until three years ago, when her last dog died and her husband strongly discouraged her getting another one due to their advancing age and her medical condition. She had a friend with four dogs who offered to take her to the vet as needed and to adopt the dog as her own, should the lady or her husband die. Still, the husband wouldn't relent. Her physician overheard her talking about wanting a dog and he asked her why. She replied, 'To love and go walking with.' When I was preparing her discharge papers later that day, the following prescription was there along with others for various medications: '1 dog. To love and to go walking with.' It was signed by her physician."

If you are planning to get a dog from a breed rescue organization, read the article "Purebreed Rescue Is a Source of Older Pets."

QUESTIONS ABOUT ADOPTING AN OLDER DOG

Won't I be adopting someone else's problems? If the dog were so wonderful, why wouldn't they have kept him? ....Answer: Older dogs lose their homes for many different reasons...most of them having nothing to do with problems the dog has, but rather with those of the person surrendering the dog. Many folks think dogs who end up at shelters or in rescue are all genetically and behaviorally inferior. But, it is not uncommon for very expensive, well-bred dogs to outlive their usefulness or novelty with folks who bought them on impulse and no longer want to take responsibility for them.

Other reasons older dogs become homeless: death of a guardian, not enough time for the dog, change in work schedule, new baby, need to move to a place where dogs are not allowed, kids going off to college, allergies, change in "lifestyle," prospective spouse doesn't like dogs. (All these reasons are taken from real case histories.)

What advantages do older dogs have over puppies or young dogs? ....Answer: Older dogs who are offered for adoption by shelters or rescue agencies generally have had some training, both in obedience and house manners. (Some dogs, due to the confusion and upset of being uprooted and finding themselves in a chaotic shelter environment, may temporarily forget their housetraining. Inevitably, once established in their new home, they remember.) Older dogs have learned what "no" means and how to leave the furniture, carpets, shoes, and other "chewables" alone. (If they hadn't learned that, they wouldn't have gotten to be "older" dogs.) They have been "socialized" and learned what it takes to be part of a "pack" and to get along with humans and, in most cases, other dogs, and in some other cases, cats, as well. Older dogs, especially those who have once known it, appreciate love and attention and quickly learn what's expected of them to gain and keep that love and attention. Older dogs know how to let you finish the newspaper, sitting calmly next to you, while your workday stress flows away and your blood pressure lowers. They are also instant companions, ready for hiking, riding in the car, walking on leash, fetching, etc. Finally, older dogs are a "known commodity." They are easy to assess for behavior and temperament, and you also don't have to guess at how big they'll grow.

Aside from any advantages an older dog has, is there any good reason to adopt an older dog instead of a puppy, who has his whole life ahead of him? ....Answer: Just about everyone who enters a shelter is looking for a puppy or a young dog (three years or under). There are also many people who go to breeders to buy puppies. By adopting an older dog, we can make a statement about compassion and the value of all life at all ages, as well as register a protest against the indiscriminate and inhumane breeding of dogs, whether it is for profit or to "teach the children about birth." And, of course, just as a puppy has his whole life ahead of him, so does an older dog have the rest of his life in front of him. You can give that older dog the best years of his life while at the same time bringing a wonderful addition into your family. Another consideration is the larger goal of making the U.S. a "no-kill" nation. By setting the example of adopting a dog who would be otherwise euthanized just because of his age, you can help create the climate that will enable the U.S. to attain that goal.

Don't older dogs cost more in vet bills? ....Answer: Veterinary attention and medication are needed at all ages and may or may not be more costly for an older dog. Before you adopt a senior, be sure you get a health report from a veterinarian. That way, if you discover that the dog has a health problem, you can decide if you are able to make the needed financial commitment.

Do older dogs have any "special needs"? ....Answer: With a health assessment of the dog, you will know whether any age-related conditions are present and you can take appropriate measures to address them. Otherwise, older dogs need all the things younger dogs do -- good nutrition, exercise (although less intensive, usually, than for a younger dog), and regular visits to the vet. The "Care Pages" on Senior Dogs Project provide further insight into maintaining an older dog's health, although much of the information also applies to young dogs.

Isn't it true that you can't train an older dog the way you can train a puppy? ....Answer: Dogs can be trained at any age. The old adage, "You can't teach an old dog new tricks," just isn't true. Autumn was called "Stupid" by her family for the first ten years of her life. She was adopted at ten years by a caring person and now, at age 14, she is winning awards for being first in her obedience class.

How long will it take for an older dog to settle into a routine with me? ....Answer: Each dog is an individual and comes with a unique set of experiences and from varying circumstances, so it is hard to predict how long a specific dog will require to make an adjustment. If a dog has been in a shelter or kennel, the stresses of such an experience may cause him to be confused and disoriented for quite some time. Some dogs forget or are confused about their housetraining. With care, patience, and a kind, understanding, loving attitude, just about any dog will come around after a while. It may be a few days, a few weeks, or a few months. In our own experience, we've had dogs who are right "at home" as soon as they walk in the door and others who have needed a couple of weeks to make a basic adjustment, and then became more and more "at home" over the course of several months.

Is there anything special I will need to do during the dog's "adjustment" period? ....Answer: Again, this will depend on the individual dog. In general, with a dog of any age, it is a good idea to set aside a period of several weeks during which you can spend more time than usual in reassuring the dog, establishing good communcation with the dog, and creating the special bond that will ensure a good future together.

What kind of help and support can I expect from the agency through which I adopt a senior dog? ....Answer: Agencies vary in the resources they have available. Some will guide you carefully through any adjustment period that may be needed; others just don't have the staff or resources. A number offer to cover the costs of veterinary care for a period of time. If you feel you need assistance of any kind, check with the agency to see if it is provided.

I just lost my old dog. What if I lose another soon after I adopt him? ....Answer: Grief is a very personal matter. Some people feel that giving a home to an older dog in need is a tribute to their former dog and actually eases their pain. Also, knowing that adoption has saved a dog from euthanasia and will allow her quality time for whatever period she has left, often enables people to focus on the positives and to deal better with loss. Consider also that there are never any guarantees about length of life with any dog. Quality of time together can matter a great deal more than quantity.

LIST OF AVAILABLE DOGS