Information on West Highland White Terrier (i.e. Westie)

Description
This sturdy, hardy, compact little terrier has a two inch all white coat that is uncurled with a soft, dense undercoat. They have bright, dark, deep-set eyes with a penetrating gaze. The ears are small, pointed and erect, giving the animal an alert ready-for-anything look. The tail is carried jauntily, is about 5-6 inches (12½-15cm.) long and should not be docked. It has a deep chest and muscular limbs. The Westie has a short, closely fitted jaw with scissors bite, a pronounced stop, and slightly convex skull.

Temperament
West Highland White Terriers are described in the standard as being "possessed of no small amount of self-esteem with a varminty appearance." This game and hardy little Terrier is easy to train. They are fairly friendly toward strangers and get along well with behaved children. Westies may snap when irritated, but are not as willful as many of the other Terrier breeds. They are lively and extremely self-assured toward other dogs. Westies usually do not pick fights with other dogs, although some males are combative with other males. They may chase a cat for fun, but usually will not hurt it. Robust, friendly, cocky and spunky. Westies just love companionship. Despite its size, they make a very good watchdog. These little dogs are easy to travel with. The Westie likes to dig and bark.

Height & Weight

Height: Dogs 10-12 inches (25-30cm.) Bitches 9-11 inches (23-28cm.)
Weight: Dogs 15-22 pounds (7-10kg.) Bitches 13-16 pounds (6-7kg.))

Health Problems

Most are fairly healthy. Some are prone to chronic skin problems, Perthe's disease (hip problems), hernias, liver disease, and jawbone calcification.

Living Conditions

Suitable for people in towns and cities as well as in the country. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Exercise

These dogs enjoy a regular walk or sessions of play in the park, but won't be too upset if they miss a day.

Life Expectancy

About 15 or more years.

Grooming

The harsh, straight, short-haired double coat is fairly easy to groom and sheds little to no hair. Simply brush regularly with a stiff bristle brush. Brushing should keep the coat clean, so bathe only when necessary. Trim around the ears and eyes with blunt-nosed scissors. The whole coat should be trimmed about every four months and stripped twice a year.

Origin

In the middle of the nineteenth century, it happened that the breeder of the Cairn Terrier in the country of Argyll, Scotland got some white pups in his litters. Those pups were selected and bred to obtain the West Highland White Terrier, which is simply a white Cairn. Westies were originally bred for controlling the population of rats, fox, otter and other vermin. This charming terrier is now mostly a companion dog.

Author and Credit for all information above: http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/westhighland.htm


Information on Scottish Terrier (i.e. Scottie; Aberdeen Terrier)

Description
This sturdy little dog has short legs and the way it is groomed makes them look even shorter. Even so, it is a strong, active animal and surprisingly agile. The coat is compact, course, and hard as bristles with a soft undercoat that protects it thoroughly from bad weather. It comes in black, wheaten, or brindle of any color. Sharply pricked ears give the Scottish Terrier a thoughtful look. It has a large nose and large teeth, and there is a stop between the skull and the muzzle. Its dark eyes are almond-shaped, and its neck is muscular. Its tail is medium-length, carried straight or slightly curved.

Temperament
Brave and alert, the Scottie is protective, hardy and lovable. They are charming and full of character. Playful and friendly as a puppy, he matures into a dignified adult. This breed has unusual variable behavior and moods. It can get moody and snappish as an adult. The Scottish Terrier makes a very good watchdog. It is inclined to be stubborn, however, and needs firm, gentle handling from an early age or it will dominate the household. This breed is sensitive to correction. Obedience training must be consistent but persuasive. Do not push this breed too far; never hit a terrier and do not play aggressive games like wrestling and tug-of-war. He can challenge family members who have not established leadership over him. Lively, proud, and intelligent, it has a reliable temperament, but does not welcome interlopers and has no interest in anyone outside its own human family. He will attach himself to one or two people and live for them. Likes to bark and dig, enjoys walks, loves to play ball games, and is thoroughly sporty, home loving and independent. The breed does best with older considerate child. It has been described as the dog that can go anywhere and do anything - a big dog in a small dog's body. It is very sensitive to criticism and praise and therefore should be trained gently. These dogs make good house pets.

Height & Weight

Height: 10-11 inches (25-28 kg.)
Weight: 19-23 pounds (8½-10½kg.)

Health Problems

Some are prone to Scottie Cramp (a movement problem), Von Willebrand's disease, flea allergy, skin, and jaw problems. These dogs are difficult welpers.

Living Conditions

This dog is good for apartment living. It is moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Prefers cool climates.

Exercise

Given a yard of reasonable size, the sporty Scottie will exercise itself, but it will happily accompany you for a walk or play session in the park, and delights in fetching sticks and balls.

Life Expectancy

About 12-15 years.

Grooming

Regular brushing of the harsh wiry coat is important and extra care should be taken when the dog is shedding. Bathe or dry shampoo as necessary. The dog should be professionally trimmed twice a year. The hair on the body is left long, like a skirt, while the hair on the face is lightly trimmed and brushed forward. This breed sheds little to no hair.

Origin

The Scottish Terrier was developed in Scotland in 1700, but the dog with the size and shape we know today dates from 1890. The breed was first called the Aberdeen Terrier, after the Scottish town of the same name. Like many other long-low breeds, the Scottie was used to hunt den animals, particularly otter, fox, badger and rabbit. Today this stylish breed is primarily a companion, though he still retains his hunting instincts.

Author and Credit for all information above: http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/scottishterrier.htm

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